An introduction to juvenile violence

Get Full Essay Get access to this section to get all help you need with your essay and educational issues. Unfortunately, the majority of studies and published literature on the effects of alcohol on violence and juvenile delinquency were from and older. This would suggest that the countries researchers have begun to focus on other areas substance abuse. Most relevant literature over the past six years pertains to juvenile drug use and its connection to violence.

An introduction to juvenile violence

Juvenile Crime, Juvenile Justice. The National Academies Press. In England and Wales, about perto year-olds were convicted or cautioned by the police for violent crimes homicide, assault, robbery, and rape in In Germany, perto year-olds and in The Netherlands perto year-olds were suspects of violent crime in Pfeiffer, Comparing how different countries deal with juvenile offenders is equally challenging.

Countries differ in the ages of young people considered legal juveniles, in how juvenile courts are organized, and in the types of institution used to sanction juvenile offenders. As Table shows, the minimum age for being considered criminally responsible varies from 7 years in Switzerland and the Australian state of Tasmania to 16 in Belgium and Russia.

The age of full criminal responsibility i. In the United States, both minimum and maximum ages of juvenile court jurisdiction vary by state, with most states having no minimum An introduction to juvenile violence although in practice, children younger than 10 are seldom seen in juvenile courts.

The maximum age of juvenile court jurisdiction is younger in many U. At the same time that states and the federal government in the United States have been moving toward treating juvenile offenders more like adult criminals, many other countries retain a strong rehabilitative stance.

The Youth Court Law of Austria, for example, describes juvenile offending as a normal step in development for which restorative justice, not punishment, is the appropriate response. The Belgium Youth Court Protection Act specifies that the only measures that can be imposed on a juvenile are for his or her care, protection, and education.

In New Zealand, sinceFamily Group Conferences have been used to replace or supplement youth courts for most of the serious criminal cases.

In the early s, England and Wales moved toward community-based sanctions for young offenders and away from institutional placements. This trend was reversed in the s, however, when England and Wales reacted to the upswing in juvenile violence in a manner similar to the United States, focusing on the offense, rather than the offender.

Criminal Justice and Public Order Act of made it easier to place offenders younger than 15 years in juvenile correctional facilities and extended the maximum length of allowable sentences.

Crime and Disorder Act of moved the English juvenile justice system even further toward a punitive, offense-based model. Page 21 Share Cite Suggested Citation: In Denmark, maximum punishments well below those available for adults are specified in law for juveniles 15 and older; juveniles under the age of 15 may not be punished, but may be referred to a social welfare agency.

In Sweden, imprisonment may only be imposed on juveniles under exceptional circumstances, and even then, the sentences imposed are shorter than for adults. The United States has a very high overall rate of incarceration. At per , the U. Although adequate juvenile incarceration figures do not exist in the United States, the incarceration rate for homicides committed by juveniles is illustrative of the difference in incarceration rates.

Comparable numbers in other countries are 2. Some of the differences in juvenile homicide incarceration rates are likely to be due to differences in homicide commission rates.

In none of the 15 countries surveyed by Weitekamp et al. Prevention, Treatment, and Control was asked to identify and analyze the full range of research studies and datasets that bear on the nature of juvenile crime, highlighting key issues and data sources that can provide evidence of prevalence and seriousness; race, gender, and class bias; and impacts of deterrence, punishment, and prevention strategies.

The panel was further asked to analyze the factors that contribute to delinquent behavior, including a review of the knowledge on child and adolescent development and its implications for prevention and control; to assess the current practices of the juvenile justice system, including the implementation of constitutional safeguards; to examine adjudication, detention and waiver practices; to explore the role of community and institutional settings; to assess the quality of data sources on the clients of both public and private juvenile justice facilities; and to assess the impact of the deinstitutionalization mandates of the Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act of on delinquency and community safety.

To meet this charge, the study panel and staff gathered information in a number of ways.

Third Annual Rutgers-Newark Conference on Youth Development and Juvenile Justice | June ,

The panel met six times between June and October to discuss data availability and research findings, identify critical issues, analyze the data and issues, seek additional information on specific concerns, formulate conclusions and recommendations, and develop this report.

Four of these meetings were preceded by workshops at which experts presented information on selected topics and engaged in discussions with panel members. Workshops were held on education and delinquency, juvenile justice system issues, developmental issues relevant to delinquency, and racial disparity in the juvenile justice system.

See Appendix E for workshop agendas. In addition to the workshops, Howard Snyder, research director of the National Center for Juvenile Justice, spent part of one meeting discussing relevant datasets with the panel members. The panel commissioned three papers: Several members of the panel made site visits to juvenile detention and correctional facilities in Texas and New York.

An introduction to juvenile violence

Study panel members and staff also consulted informally with various experts between meetings. The charge to the panel was extremely broad, covering many topics that merit books unto themselves, and indeed some of the areas have been the subject of more than one recent book.

The panel chose to provide a broad overview of juvenile crime and the juvenile justice system, touching on all the topics in its charge, but going into various levels of depth depending on the amount and quality of data available.Introduction.

An Urgent Call to Action. In the 's, pervasive problems with juvenile violence threaten the safety and security of communities across the country, and projections for the future are cause for nationwide alarm. Domestic violence by juvenile offenders. Full report: Domestic and family violence by juvenile offenders: offender, victim and incident characteristics (pdf Kb) Release date: Embargo: am, Tuesday 2 October, A new study of domestic violence (DV) perpetrated by juveniles has found that in the majority of cases the victim is a family member, typically the parent of the offender.

The Relationship between Juvenile Delinquency and Family Unit Structure By definition, an intact home is a two-parent (one male, one female) structure. Any deviation from this, regardless of reason (e.g., death, divorce, separation or.

Youth Violence Prevention Programs. On this Page Hide. Introduction. Youth violence is widespread in the United States.

It is the second leading cause of death for young people between the ages of 10 and Violence can also affect the health of communities. North Carolina Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency. The new edition of Girls, Delinquency, and Juvenile Justice combines cutting-edge research and expanded coverage of girls’ delinquency, including coverage of girls in gangs and the sexual trafficking of girls, to provide students with an accessible, up-to-date, and globally oriented textbook..

Including global perspectives and coverage of cutting-edge research, this is the only textbook to. Nov 01,  · Homicide is the third leading cause of death for youth in our country. In , more than , young people ages were treated in emergency departments for injuries sustained from violence.

1. Each neighborhood and community has unique experiences with violence and different resources available to them.

Juvenile Delinquency: Cause and Effect